Calorie-covered Cardio - ABCbodybuilding

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Old 05-20-2012, 01:46 PM
keeptruckin keeptruckin is offline
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Default Calorie-covered Cardio

I'm wondering if there is any opinion on doing additional cardio, even on a bulk, that is "calorie-covered?" By this I mean that a cardio session is intentionally inserted once or twice a week but is accompanied by additional calorie intake that roughly matches the calorie output of the cardio.

It has been my experience that cardio has potential to be a muscle waster if I'm not careful. Of course, I never did calorie covered cardio. I can see some potentially serious advantages:

1. Improved heart conditioning (stronger workouts, especially legs and back)
2. Improved blood flow
3. Better health - man, what a concept!

Has this already been settled by grand-unified bodybuilding debates?
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:22 PM
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Interesting thought...but i doubt it would be measurably effective.

Our bodies simply don't provide enough feedback, other then gross weight - and even that is subjective. 30 minutes of sustained Target Heart Rate aerobics is burning hundreds of calories...which equates out to ounces of adipose (body fat) reduction.

Cardio is first and foremost heart/lung conditioning. If your working within your Targeted heart rate, then up to 85% of the energy required to sustain it is coming from adipose tissue since glycogen stores have all but been exhausted. Also, the number of total calories would be radically different from one person to the next. For example, someone that is light weight and 'aerobically fit' would consume less calories then someone who isn't. Since there is no metric or baseline for either - how would you know your getting enough calories, or too much? But again... The difference is in ounces. Eating them before or pulling from body fat is the same net result.

Personally I don't believe micro-managing calories is even possible. But i could be wrong.
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Old 05-22-2012, 11:46 AM
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I really don't think it would be necessary to add in extra calories specifically for the cardio session. If you are bulking you are likely already in a surplus.

Just do the cardio for the benefits you mentioned and as long as you don't go overboard, you won't have to stress muscle loss.
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:42 PM
keeptruckin keeptruckin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildgrl View Post
Interesting thought...but i doubt it would be measurably effective.

Our bodies simply don't provide enough feedback, other then gross weight - and even that is subjective. 30 minutes of sustained Target Heart Rate aerobics is burning hundreds of calories...which equates out to ounces of adipose (body fat) reduction.

Cardio is first and foremost heart/lung conditioning. If your working within your Targeted heart rate, then up to 85% of the energy required to sustain it is coming from adipose tissue since glycogen stores have all but been exhausted. Also, the number of total calories would be radically different from one person to the next. For example, someone that is light weight and 'aerobically fit' would consume less calories then someone who isn't. Since there is no metric or baseline for either - how would you know your getting enough calories, or too much? But again... The difference is in ounces. Eating them before or pulling from body fat is the same net result.

Personally I don't believe micro-managing calories is even possible. But i could be wrong.
That part is done empirically by tracking the calories and my weight. But as far the eating/cardio goes, it starts out with an estimate of how much cardio for X calories. The idea is that I add X calories and do approximately X calories of cardio WHILE LEAVING EVERYTHING ELSE THE SAME (calorie intake, meal frequency, calorie balance) whether bulking or cutting.

I actually do think there is an advantage - heart conditioning as well as more calories of micronutrition opportunity. The question is whether or not the additional cardio will demand additional micronutrition equal to the X extra calories consumed. I do know people with higher metabolism are at an advantage, whether cutting or bulking. Part of the reason is the additional micronutrition opportunity (i.e. someone who burns 3000 calories a day and is running a 500 calorie deficit gets 500 more calories of intake micronutrtion opportunity compared to someone who bursn 2500 calories a day and is running a 500 calorie deficit). I'm thinking "calorie covered cardio" may actually end up simulating a faster metabolism ... plus the heart workout benefit.
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Old 05-24-2012, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keeptruckin View Post
That part is done empirically by tracking the calories and my weight. But as far the eating/cardio goes, it starts out with an estimate of how much cardio for X calories. The idea is that I add X calories and do approximately X calories of cardio WHILE LEAVING EVERYTHING ELSE THE SAME (calorie intake, meal frequency, calorie balance) whether bulking or cutting.

I actually do think there is an advantage - heart conditioning as well as more calories of micronutrition opportunity. The question is whether or not the additional cardio will demand additional micronutrition equal to the X extra calories consumed. I do know people with higher metabolism are at an advantage, whether cutting or bulking. Part of the reason is the additional micronutrition opportunity (i.e. someone who burns 3000 calories a day and is running a 500 calorie deficit gets 500 more calories of intake micronutrtion opportunity compared to someone who bursn 2500 calories a day and is running a 500 calorie deficit). I'm thinking "calorie covered cardio" may actually end up simulating a faster metabolism ... plus the heart workout benefit.
Ahhh, Berardi's G-Flux concept. It has worked for me, that said, you probably won't have to add in that many calories.
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:35 AM
strauss strauss is offline
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Every one has their point of view but in my opinion I actually do think there is an advantage - heart conditioning as well as more calories of micronutrition opportunity. The question is whether or not the additional cardio will demand additional micronutrition equal to the X extra calories consumed.
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Last edited by strauss; 02-15-2014 at 06:49 AM.
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