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Old 02-22-2012, 06:28 PM
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Default Hunger

What causes this feeling of "hunger"?
Is it exclusively related to the size of our stomach (Enlarged stomach->Because of excessive amounts of food=more hunger) or the body can create this feeling in order to get the nutrients it needs? (bigger muscles=more need for prtein/carbs/etc=more hunger)

Thnx in advance

Last edited by ThanosShadow; 02-22-2012 at 07:30 PM.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:29 PM
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The feeling of hunger is both physiological and psychological. Essentially your brain controls the feeling of hunger because as your body realizes a lack of nutrients are being consumed the brain will send a signal to "feed me the body needs nutrients". It is not uncommon for someone with a higher metabolism to experience this feeling more often than others and individuals who exercise daily usually experience this feeling more often as well. Excessive feelings of hunger can be attributed to different disease states such as issues with the hypothalamus and diabetes. There are different foods that will make you more hungry such as carbohydrates, fats and sugary foods. Specifically fats and sugars can become addictive in nature causing your brain to crave it. On the other hand, there are also foods that will suppress your appetite such as fiber based foods and protein.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:05 PM
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Thank you for your answer.
And what about hypoglycemia? I've read in the book Clinical Pathological Biochemistry ( written by Karlson, Grok, Gross) that hypoglycemia stimulates the release of growth hormone. And I wonder, when I am hungry, my blood sugar levels are low? Thus the hormone is released?

Thnx again.
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Old 02-23-2012, 04:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThanosShadow View Post
Thank you for your answer.
And what about hypoglycemia? I've read in the book Clinical Pathological Biochemistry ( written by Karlson, Grok, Gross) that hypoglycemia stimulates the release of growth hormone. And I wonder, when I am hungry, my blood sugar levels are low? Thus the hormone is released?

Thnx again.
It is true that hypoglycemia will cause your body to produce growth hormones because your brain senses the drop in blood glucose and is trying to raise the levels back to normal with hormones that are known to raise blood glucose levels. Growth hormone is not the only form of hormone that is secreted during hypoglycemia cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine are also produced. I am not sure if you are diabetic but if you are then hypoglycemia is certainly possible for the cause of your hunger. If you are not diabetic, I would find it unlikely to be the cause but not out of the realm of possibility. Also, if you are hypoglycemic you should see other symptoms such as nervousness, excessive sweating, feeling weak and heart palpitations. Hypoglycemia is no laughing matter it can cause dangerous symptoms and will have negative effects on your brain's ability to function.
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:20 PM
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Ah thank you, but no, luckily I haven been diagnosed with any disease of this type, I was only asking because, you know, hormones seem to us like our own "steroids", and when we hear about,umm, things like "arginine raises hgh levels", we go crazy...
That's why I am asking
By the way, is it clear whether amino acid pills spike insulin or not?
If they dont, we may be lucky enough to reap the benefits of hypoglycemia and high HGH levels, but without neglecting our need for the most important favourit nutrient: protein! (hydrolyzed )

Τhnx
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Old 02-24-2012, 07:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThanosShadow View Post
Ah thank you, but no, luckily I haven been diagnosed with any disease of this type, I was only asking because, you know, hormones seem to us like our own "steroids", and when we hear about,umm, things like "arginine raises hgh levels", we go crazy...
That's why I am asking
By the way, is it clear whether amino acid pills spike insulin or not?
If they dont, we may be lucky enough to reap the benefits of hypoglycemia and high HGH levels, but without neglecting our need for the most important favourit nutrient: protein! (hydrolyzed )

Τhnx
Some protein sources can cause increases in insulin and specifically protein sources that are higher in the branched chain amino acids iso-leucine, leucine and valine. However, it is not the most effective method for increasing insulin. There are bodybuilders that will spike their insulin levels after a workout by consuming simple sugars such as grapes, watermelon, gatorade, powerade, and pretty much anything that contains sugar. This spike in insulin will cause glucose to be transported into your muscle cells and allow for increased uptake of amino acids and a decrease in protein breakdown after a workout. With that said, it is still not wise to consume large amounts of simple sugars because the negative side effects outweigh the positives in my opinion, but if there is a time that you would want to eat them, after your workout would be the most beneficial. Also, if you decide to utilize the simple sugar spike of insulin after a workout, I would advise consuming a balanced meal along with it i.e. a healthy protein, a complex carbohydrate and an unsaturated fat food. This way you will most effectively utilize the spike in insulin and the movement of glucose into the muscle cells. I would not advise trying to make yourself hypoglycemic for the benefits of increased growth hormone levels. Your workouts will suffer from the increased weakness due to the hypoglycemia which will make it difficult to perform an effective workout in order to increase muscle strength and mass.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:18 AM
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Another thing to remember.. the nerves to the brain cant directly recognise a difference between hunger and thirst.. when feel hungry drink a glass of water.. at least 7 times out of 10 for me im thirsty and not hungry
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyborg_Sups View Post
Some protein sources can cause increases in insulin and specifically protein sources that are higher in the branched chain amino acids iso-leucine, leucine and valine. However, it is not the most effective method for increasing insulin. There are bodybuilders that will spike their insulin levels after a workout by consuming simple sugars such as grapes, watermelon, gatorade, powerade, and pretty much anything that contains sugar. This spike in insulin will cause glucose to be transported into your muscle cells and allow for increased uptake of amino acids and a decrease in protein breakdown after a workout. With that said, it is still not wise to consume large amounts of simple sugars because the negative side effects outweigh the positives in my opinion, but if there is a time that you would want to eat them, after your workout would be the most beneficial. Also, if you decide to utilize the simple sugar spike of insulin after a workout, I would advise consuming a balanced meal along with it i.e. a healthy protein, a complex carbohydrate and an unsaturated fat food. This way you will most effectively utilize the spike in insulin and the movement of glucose into the muscle cells. I would not advise trying to make yourself hypoglycemic for the benefits of increased growth hormone levels. Your workouts will suffer from the increased weakness due to the hypoglycemia which will make it difficult to perform an effective workout in order to increase muscle strength and mass.
Thank you for your info, really helpful!


Quote:
Originally Posted by klosey View Post
Another thing to remember.. the nerves to the brain cant directly recognise a difference between hunger and thirst.. when feel hungry drink a glass of water.. at least 7 times out of 10 for me im thirsty and not hungry
That's reaaaall interesting, I have to try it myself, too
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