ABCbodybuilding - View Single Post - Scientific Discussion of the Week--The art of coaching: feedback, modelling and skill failure
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Old 11-16-2005, 03:44 AM
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Default Re: Scientific Discussion of the Week--The art of coaching: feedback, modelling and skill failure

Thanks for your incite, Will! [img]/forum/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

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I agree that feedback + video is far more effective than video alone. This method of technical analysis can be a very useful tool. However would you agree that it should not be used too frequently so that the athlete becomes engaged in more active problem solving themselves and as to not develop a dependence on such tools?


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Yes, that is definitely the case, Ryan. You want to limit the KR/KP as with anything else.

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I would opt for the instructor to know which flaws to stress. At first, when the athlete is completely new to the lift, some things may be important, while others aren't necessary to comment on. If we take the puzzle example again, it's always easier to start with corners and edges, and then you can continue building on that.

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This is excellent advice, Will.

It is commonly advised to critique starting with big errors, then later going to small errors. This is to avoid information overload.

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Definitely - but the learner needs to have the tools to work with at first. Often the student is blind to his own faults in the beginning.

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You again make a great point. Evidence suggests you want to fade the feedback. So novice athletes should receive more feedback than advanced athletes. But the more they can learn through intrinsic processes, the better. So feedback should be kept at bay, still.

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I must disagree there. Or no, I agree with that IF there is an imperfect technique being shown, feedback MUST be provided as to why it's imperfect. BUT, I don't think it's better than to have a perfect technique shown. As a student, I feel one should know there is a level one can attain where there is perfect technique, and one should see what it looks like, and get to know why it is perfect. The imperfect parts can be shown from what the student does (wrong). I don't know if I made my point accurately here...

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Wow, that is an interesting point you bring up.

Well, studies are very clear that a learning model (one that makes errors) is superior to a correct model (one that does not make errors). However, I am not aware of a study that combines both types of models. Iíll ask Dr. McCullough about that. [img]/forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]


Good post, William. [img]/forum/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
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