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Josh LaMarre 07-07-2012 08:57 PM

A Novel Muscle Memory Training/Supplementation Rotation
 
Hello All,

For the past week, I have been playing around with an idea in my head. I have been reading the articles/forums for this site for about a month now, and believe I have a new way of cycling training methods, supplements, and diet to take maximum advantage of the theory for connective tissue stretching behind muscle memory.

First, let me cover some assumptions that I have made:
-Stretching of connective tissue is effective in inducing muscle memory type growth
-Sodium, Creatine, Carbohydrates, and hyper-hydration all increase cellular volume through an increase in osmotic pressure (I would assume potassium and other salts would have a similar effect)
-Cell Volumization is capable of providing sufficient pressure to induce connective tissue stretching
-'Pump' may be capable of providing pressure to induce connective tissue stretching, and will provide an increased volume from which to draw salts nutrients, etc
-Stretching while 'pumped' may be able to increase the above mentioned pressure
-Vitamin C is effective in promoting connective tissue expansion through increased repair

With that out of the way, here is my question: If muscle grows best when in an 'empty bag', why are trying to grow it in a bag full of water? Yes, I realize that is how its stretched, but the pressure exerted by the connective tissue would be at its highest at that point (equal opposite reaction). So...

My idea is to cycle. Not a periodization, or a creatine cycle; but a cycle in muscular volume. Here is how I imagine it:

1. Start by stopping. I assume most people who would do this already use creatine, eat carbs, drink water, etc. Stop (well, ;) maybe not completely for water). Limit salt in your diet, stop creatine, go low carb (especially before your workout, but this is NOT a cut, keep your calories up), stop drinking so much water (don't dehydrate yourself though). This will serve the purpose of making your muscles as small as possible while still containing the same protein content.

2. Bulk without changing the above. Get as big as you can without increasing the volume of cells through fluid. Try to avoid workouts which give you an excessive pump. Keep them small and often to minimize glycogen depletion. Keep this up until you start getting painful pumps again or plateau. Make sure it is at least long enough to get all the residual creatine out of your system. The idea here, is to get to the point where the connective tissue is again limiting you, but without any of the fluid pressures.

3. Now we change. Load your creatine, hyper-hydrate, take up the carb intake, eat salt again. The idea here is to take your dry muscle that is already at the limits of your connective tissue, and make it explode by shoving as much water as possible into your cells.

4. Again, all of this is bulk, but the workouts for this portion shouldn't focus on gaining muscle; they should focus on stretching your connective tissue beyond the point you ever thought was possible. If you gain muscle during this time, great more volume, but that shouldn't be the goal. Pump like a mad man, take vitamin C, and stretch constantly. Push it like this for a month or two then...

5. Restart.

So there you have it. I expect that this procedure would produce a huge amount more pressure on the connective tissue, and result in a large amount of growth.

Please, let me know what you think. I would love to have some criticism, ideas for improvement, flat out telling me where I am wrong. Thanks

Josh

YYZgeddylee 07-18-2012 05:10 PM

interesting thoughts josh, makes sense.
are you going to be our first guinnea pig ?


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